2003 Margaux, Chateau Bordeaux Blend
Bordeaux Blend - 1.5L

  • WS 98
  • WA 98
  • IWC 96

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This product is
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WS 98
Wine Spectator - Wine Spectator, March 2006
Ultraconcentrated with layers and layers of fruit and superfine tannins. Plenty of fruit mineral and meat character. Full-bodied yet refined and classy it coats your palate with gorgeous fruit and ripe tannins. Truly... Ultraconcentrated with layers and layers of fruit and superfine tannins. Plenty of fruit mineral and meat character. Full-bodied yet refined and classy it coats your palate with gorgeous fruit and ripe tannins. Truly superb. One of the wines of the vintage. Best after 2012. 10830 cases made.
WA 98
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate - Robert Parker's Wine Advocate, August 2014
This was the finest performance by this wine that I have seen since it was released. I did not expect the 2003 Chateau Margaux to show this well in a vintage where the southern part of the Medoc was clearly less... This was the finest performance by this wine that I have seen since it was released. I did not expect the 2003 Chateau Margaux to show this well in a vintage where the southern part of the Medoc was clearly less impressive than the north. However, it is a beautiful, dark plum/purple-tinged effort with sensational aromatics, a full-bodied mouthfeel, and a youthfulness, precision and freshness that belie what one generally associates with this vintage. It can be drunk now and over the next 15-20 years. Kudos to Chateau Margaux. - Robert M. Parker, Jr.
IWC 96
Stephen Tanzer's IWC - Stephen Tanzer's IWC, May 2006
Full saturated red-ruby. Knockout nose combines redcurrant tropical chocolate leather woodsmoke and nutty oak with exotic chocolate mint and coffee liqueur; still manages to retain floral lift even in this beastly... Full saturated red-ruby. Knockout nose combines redcurrant tropical chocolate leather woodsmoke and nutty oak with exotic chocolate mint and coffee liqueur; still manages to retain floral lift even in this beastly vintage. Then wonderfully fat sweet and full even if it comes across as almost heavy following the ineffable 2005 and 2004 examples. But "relatively inelegant" for Margaux still suggests a degree of refinement that few chateaux can match in the greatest vintages. A hugely rich and dense wine that finishes with elevated but ripe tannins and great length with a subtle suggestion of dry spices. Pontallier says the terroir will take over in 20 years "like with the '82." Splendid.
Color & Type Red
Varietal Bordeaux Blend
Country France
Region Bordeaux
Sub-region Margaux
Vintage 2003

Label

Since the 17th Century, the grand vin of Chateau Margaux has been recognized as one of the greatest wines in the entire world. It owes its unique qualities to the genius of its terroir as well as to the passionate work of a succession of generations. It’s a remarkable wine that comes from a combination of characteristics that are only rarely found: finesse, elegance, complexity, density, intensity, length and freshness. Although its tannic concentration may be exceptional, it’s rare to detect astringency.

The great vintages are distinguished by their formidable ability to move us, while the lesser vintages give pleasure to wine enthusiasts. Chateau Margaux has an extraordinary ability to evolve with age, developing finesse, aromatic aromatic complexity, and a remarkable presence on the palate.

Winery

Margaux, Chateau

Chateau Margaux is a famous wine estate in the Medoc region, which along with Lafite, Latour and Haut Brion, was rated a First Growth in the original 1855 Bordeaux Classification. It covers 262 hectares, of which 82 hectares are planted to Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Petit Verdot and Cabernet Franc, and 12 hectares to Sauvignon Blanc.

In the 12th century, the property was called “La Mothe de Margaux” (the Margaux mound) and by the 16th century, wine was being produced at the estate. In 1705, the London Gazette advertised the first auction of 230 barrels of “Margose” and the 1771 vintage was the first “claret” to appear in a Christie’s catalogue. Indeed one of America’s Founding Fathers and vintner in his own right, Thomas Jefferson, visited this great estate in the late 18th century and declared it to be a vineyard of “first quality”. When Bertrand Douat, Marquis de la Colonilla, acquired the estate, he built the chateau that is often nicknamed the “Versailles of the Medoc”, a rare example of the neo-palladian style in France.

Andre Mentzelopoulos purchased the property in 1977, investing heavily in the estate and a program of improvements. Since his death in 1980, the property has been run by his daughter Corinne who continued his work in restoring the chateau to its former glory.