2004 Haut Brion Bordeaux Blend
Bordeaux Blend - 750ML

  • WE 96
  • W&S 96
  • WS 95
  • NM 93
  • WA 93
  • IWC 91

Reg: $516.94

$491.94

This product is
out of stock

Reg: $516.94

$491.94

This product is
out of stock

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WE 96
Wine Enthusiast - Wine Enthusiast, June 2007
Of the pair of châteaux La Mission Haut-Brion and Haut-Brion (both owned by the Dillon banking family) that face each other across the crowded streets of Pessac Haut-Brion is the one with the structure the darkness the... Of the pair of châteaux La Mission Haut-Brion and Haut-Brion (both owned by the Dillon banking family) that face each other across the crowded streets of Pessac Haut-Brion is the one with the structure the darkness the brooding character. This is so true of 2004 with its hugely firm structure underlying the initial supple fruit. At the end the acidity is an enticing surprise lifting the aftertaste.
W&S 96
Wine & Spirits - Wine & Spirits, October 2007
Open the bottle and you'll find harmony in the glass but the wine remains subtle stony and mute as if the flavors lie behind a closed door. Over the course of several days that door begins to open the stoniness transforms... Open the bottle and you'll find harmony in the glass but the wine remains subtle stony and mute as if the flavors lie behind a closed door. Over the course of several days that door begins to open the stoniness transforms into sleek fruit as if to mirror the complexity of the multicolored pebbles that sustain Haut-Brion's vines a range of flavors from red to purple to black. The structure grows increasingly substantial while the harmony remains lending the wine mysterious power. Twenty years from now this will just begin to reach a plateau and should sustain itself long after.
WS 95
Wine Spectator - Wine Spectator, March 2007
Wonderful aromas of dried flowers currant berries and mineral. Full-bodied yet reserved and refined. Lovely texture with a pure silk feel. Seamless and beautiful. Great length. Even better than from barrel. Best after... Wonderful aromas of dried flowers currant berries and mineral. Full-bodied yet reserved and refined. Lovely texture with a pure silk feel. Seamless and beautiful. Great length. Even better than from barrel. Best after 2012. 12500 cases made. -JS
NM 93
Neal Martin's Wine Journal - Neal Martin's Wine Journal, January 2011
93+ Tasted at the French Embassy in London. The Haut-Brion ’04 may be entering a rather awkward phase. The nose is reticent at first and demands continued coaxing from the glass. Blackberry, cranberry and leather... 93+ Tasted at the French Embassy in London. The Haut-Brion ’04 may be entering a rather awkward phase. The nose is reticent at first and demands continued coaxing from the glass. Blackberry, cranberry and leather eventually emerge, later joined by bay leaf, leather and a touch of wild heather. The palate is medium-bodied with ripe tannins, dominated by cedar and undergrowth characters. It does lack a little depth and there is a touch of piquancy towards the finish. I feel this is entering a dumb phase but will come through the other side with all guns firing. Drink 2015-2030.
WA 93
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate - Robert Parker's Wine Advocate, March 2017
It has been a few years since I last tasted the 2004 Haut-Brion. Now at 12 years of age, it retains its deep color. The bouquet is "pleasant" if not as complex as the 2004 Latour, yet it's possibly just biding its time as... It has been a few years since I last tasted the 2004 Haut-Brion. Now at 12 years of age, it retains its deep color. The bouquet is "pleasant" if not as complex as the 2004 Latour, yet it's possibly just biding its time as it gradually opens with black fruit, black olive, even a touch of mint that might dupe you into thinking Pauillac. The palate is medium-bodied and very harmonious, almost caressing thanks to the Merlot lending that velvety texture. The second half changes tack, the Cabernet nudging the Merlot off the stage and delivering a more structured, possibly foursquare finish that is linear and correct. It is an excellent wine for the vintage although it will always be overshadowed by the 2005 inter alia. Maybe more personality just needs to develop? Tasted September 2016. - Neal Martin
IWC 91
Stephen Tanzer's IWC - Stephen Tanzer's IWC, May 2007
Good deep ruby-red. Reticent nose showed some dark cherry with aeration. Densely packed but youthfully closed even a bit austere today offering hints of black raspberry and minerals. This is fairly tannic wine (the IPT is... Good deep ruby-red. Reticent nose showed some dark cherry with aeration. Densely packed but youthfully closed even a bit austere today offering hints of black raspberry and minerals. This is fairly tannic wine (the IPT is 72) but there's nothing hard about it. My sample gained in sweetness and texture with aeration although its fruit character remained tightly wound. Give this time in a carafe if you plan to try it anytime soon. At this tasting the '04 La Mission was showing much more personality.
Color & Type Red
Varietal Bordeaux Blend
Country France
Region Bordeaux
Sub-region Pessac Leognan
Vintage 2004

Label

Haut-Brion’s grand vin is the embodiment of five centuries of tradition and plays a pivotal role in the worldwide history of wine. It is the oldest of the Bordeaux classed growths, the inventor of a new style of wine fashioned in the seventeenth century, and considered the world’s first luxury brand.

Typically more Merlot dominant than other Left Bank wines, the terroir of Haut-Brion is expressed through its empyreumatic bouquet (Havana cigars, chocolate, roasting, cedar wood, and so on). The attack is restrained, with precise yet exceedingly soft tannins. But the power of this wine is revealed in the surprising long mid-palate and even longer finish.

Winery

Haut Brion

The oldest of Bordeaux’s five first growths and the only property outside the Medoc to be included in the 1855 Classification, Chateau Haut-Brion was founded by Jean de Pontac in 1533. The name derives from the Celtic word briga, meaning “hill” or “high place”, and refers to the gravelly elevated terrain situated between the Le Peuge and Le Serpent streams.

History shows that as early as 1660, Haut-Brion wines were already appreciated at royal tables as evidenced by the purchase of 169 bottles by King Charles II of England, noted in the royal cellar book. Among the wine’s admirers are the famous London diarist Samuel Pepys, and Thomas Jefferson, who had distinguished the wine’s quality long before the 1855 Classification.

Arnaud III de Pontac was responsible for building the estate’s international reputation and for creating a new style of wine that is the basis for all currently classified growths - an era which historians have described as a revolution in winemaking.

Chateau Haut-Brion was acquired by the American financier Clarence Dillon on May 13, 1935 and has been managed by the same family since. Much of the estate’s success is also credited to the Delmas family, who have worked the estate for three generations. Nearly five centuries after the creation of its vineyard and 350 years after the first published mention under its current name, Chateau Haut-Brion remains one of the finest wines in the world today.