2006 Leoville-Las Cases Leoville-Las Cases
Bordeaux Blend - 3L
  • WA 96
  • DC 96
  • WS 95
  • DC 95
  • WE 95
  • JL 95
  • VN 94

Reg: $995.00

$795.00

In Stock: 0 btls
Ships Immediately

Pre-Arrival: 1 btls
ETA: Oct. 2020

Reg: $995.00

$795.00

In Stock: 0 btls
Ships Immediately

Pre-Arrival: 1 btls
ETA: Oct. 2020

Shipping info Storage info

WA 96
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate, May 2016
Tasted at Bordeaux Index's annual 10-Year On tasting in London and then blind at Farr Vintners horizontal, the 2006 Château Léoville Las-Cases has a very complex bouquet with heady scents of blackcurrant, kirsch, crushed... expand Tasted at Bordeaux Index's annual 10-Year On tasting in London and then blind at Farr Vintners horizontal, the 2006 Château Léoville Las-Cases has a very complex bouquet with heady scents of blackcurrant, kirsch, crushed violets, rock salt and just a hint of cassis. It is backward and can barely contain its energy. The palate is medium-bodied with fine tannin, very symmetrical and poised, a fine line of acidity interwoven through the black fruit, touches of citrus fruit developing towards the poised and tensile finish. This is a beautiful wine from Jean-Hubert Delon, but it needs several years in bottle. Tasted April 2016. - Neal Martin collapse
DC 96
Decanter, July 2016
Tension and muscular energy on display, with sweet plums and cassis, which are polished to perfection. Strands of silky, weighty, well-worked tannins are exceptional for the vintage. Still young, with a full life ahead... expand Tension and muscular energy on display, with sweet plums and cassis, which are polished to perfection. Strands of silky, weighty, well-worked tannins are exceptional for the vintage. Still young, with a full life ahead, but I’d be happy to plough through its youthful stage by decanting for a few hours and sinking into this beautifully balanced, monumental wine. collapse
WS 95
Wine Spectator, February 2009
Offers a pure nose of crushed raspberry and violet with aniseed. Full-bodied with beautiful well-integrated tannins and a long polished texture to the finish. Very beautiful. Harmonious and structured. Best after 2015. -JS
DC 95
Decanter, November 2018
Since 1959 the estate has kept 50% of production back for a second release when the wine is ready to drink, and this vintage has not yet seen its mature release (they are currently on the 2004). You can see why - it's an... expand Since 1959 the estate has kept 50% of production back for a second release when the wine is ready to drink, and this vintage has not yet seen its mature release (they are currently on the 2004). You can see why - it's an exceptional wine that still needs time in the cellar. The biggest difference that you see between grand vin and second wine is the size, shape and layers of the tannins. Here they are closed, barely getting going and yet unquestionably full of purpose, doing their job of defining and controlling the dark fruits. Coiled energy supports gorgeous crushed cassis and slate. This still has decades ahead of it. collapse
WE 95
Wine Enthusiast, March 2009
While the aromas are tight and firm, once it is in the mouth, this wine just explodes. The tannins are dark, almost impenetrable, dry and dense. These tannins are a layer over the fruit that just piles up with ripe... expand While the aromas are tight and firm, once it is in the mouth, this wine just explodes. The tannins are dark, almost impenetrable, dry and dense. These tannins are a layer over the fruit that just piles up with ripe blackberry juice, an edge of blueberry. The soft sweetness of this range of flavors continues on the finish, pitted against the tannins. ROGER VOSS collapse
JL 95
TheWineCellarInsider.com, May 2016
Powerful, mouth filling, tannic and concentrated, most of this wine is being held back in reserve, waiting for the day when the tannins are resolved, the secondary notes can jump to the forefront and the wine softens its... expand Powerful, mouth filling, tannic and concentrated, most of this wine is being held back in reserve, waiting for the day when the tannins are resolved, the secondary notes can jump to the forefront and the wine softens its muscular style. There is no denying its quality, but it's equally hard to deny its drinkability at 10 years of age. There is a good sense of purity of fruit that really stays with you behind the massive wall of creamy tannins. But its going to take at least a decade, and probably longer to breach that wall. Read more at:https://www.thewinecellarinsider.com/wine-tasting-note/?vintage=2006&wine=Chateau%20Leoville%20Las%20Cases collapse
VN 94
Vinous, June 2009
Bright full ruby. Brooding aromas of cassis black cherry minerals bitter chocolate shoe polish and violet; more Pauillac than Saint-Julien on the nose. Then rich lush and powerful with impressive fullness and volume. As... expand Bright full ruby. Brooding aromas of cassis black cherry minerals bitter chocolate shoe polish and violet; more Pauillac than Saint-Julien on the nose. Then rich lush and powerful with impressive fullness and volume. As full and sweet as this is there's no impression of excess weight and the back end shows a distinctly austere quality even if the serious tannins are nicely buffered by the wine's rich middle. Really stains the palate with flavor on the aftertaste. Wonderfully ripe cabernet sauvignon here; in fact most of the cab franc in 2006 was declassified into the Clos du Marquis. 94 points collapse
Category Description
Color & Type Red
Varietal Bordeaux Blend
Country France
Region Bordeaux
Sub-region St Julien
Vintage 2006
Size 3L

Label

The Grand Vin is the product of exceptional terroirs from the heart of the original Leoville estate. These are located mainly in the Clos Leoville-Las Cases, which you pass as you leave the village of Saint-Julien for Pauillac. They extend over nearly 60 hectares producing Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet Franc with a complex, polished expression and characteristics which are totally unique to the Grand Vin of Las Cases.

Winery

Leoville-Las Cases

One of the oldest Medoc estates, Domaine de Leoville belonged to some of the wealthiest and most influential noble French families before it was acquired by the Las Cases family. Like many properties after the French Revolution, the estate was divided between 1826 and 1840 into the three Leovilles we know today: Leoville-Las Cases, Leoville-Poyferre and Leoville-Barton.

Chateau Leoville-Las Cases was created, thanks to a kind of birthright, from three-fifths of the original estate, including the very heart of the property. The Grand Vin has therefore been sourced from the best part of the original terroir since the 17th century.

Pierre Jean, Adolphe, and Gabriel de Las Cases were successive heirs to the property until 1900, when Theophile Skawinski purchased a share in the estate and became its manager. Leoville-Las Cases has now been managed by the same family since the late 19th century and is today represented by Jean-Hubert Delon, sole owner of the chateau and proprietor of Chateau Potensac in the Medoc and Chateau Nenin in Pomerol.