2009 d'Arenberg The Dead Arm
Syrah - 750ML

  • WA 95
  • JH 94
  • IWC 93
  • WE 92
  • W&S 92

Reg: $64.94

$59.94

This product is
out of stock

Reg: $64.94

$59.94

This product is
out of stock

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WA 95
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate - Robert Parker's Wine Advocate, February 2012
Very deep garnet-purple colored, the 2009 The Dead Arm Shiraz presents an intense and complex nose of blackberry preserves and dried mulberries over coffee, black olives, smoky bacon and humus. The palate is richly... Very deep garnet-purple colored, the 2009 The Dead Arm Shiraz presents an intense and complex nose of blackberry preserves and dried mulberries over coffee, black olives, smoky bacon and humus. The palate is richly fruited and nicely balanced with layers of savory and dark berry flavors and crisp acid textured by medium-firm finely grained tannins. It finishes long with hints of menthol and marmite toast coming through. It should be drinking best 2013 to 2024+. - Lisa Perrotti-Brown
JH 94
James Halliday - James Halliday, February 2012
Deep, inky purple-crimson; in archetypal Dead Arm style, powerful and rich, but given some welcome lift by the mix of bitter chocolate and savoury/spicy notes on the palate. This is a style that will not change any time... Deep, inky purple-crimson; in archetypal Dead Arm style, powerful and rich, but given some welcome lift by the mix of bitter chocolate and savoury/spicy notes on the palate. This is a style that will not change any time soon, and, within that context, is a good example.
IWC 93
Stephen Tanzer's IWC - Stephen Tanzer's IWC, August 2011
Opaque ruby. A complex, floral-accented bouquet displays cherry-cola, cassis, bacon fat, licorice and candied violet. Initially firm and linear but quickly unfolds to offer sweet dark berry and bitter cherry flavors and... Opaque ruby. A complex, floral-accented bouquet displays cherry-cola, cassis, bacon fat, licorice and candied violet. Initially firm and linear but quickly unfolds to offer sweet dark berry and bitter cherry flavors and an overlay of baking spices. Vanilla and cola nuances build with air and carry through a long, gently tannic, focused finish. Very rich but I get no impression of excess weight here.
WE 92
Wine Enthusiast - Wine Enthusiast, September 2013
As always, d’Arenberg’s top Shiraz isn’t all cuddles and charm. It’s rather firm in texture, with rugged tannins that impart a dusty edge to the lengthy finish. But this vintage the fruit comes through clearer than it has... As always, d’Arenberg’s top Shiraz isn’t all cuddles and charm. It’s rather firm in texture, with rugged tannins that impart a dusty edge to the lengthy finish. But this vintage the fruit comes through clearer than it has sometimes in the past, bringing bright berry notes that marry well with hints of campfire smoke and grilled meat. Try a bottle after 2016.
W&S 92
Wine & Spirits - Wine & Spirits, October 2012
Named for the eutypa fungus that kills off one side of a bush vine, leaving the fruit on the other side that much more concentrated, The Dead Arm is d’Arenberg’s top selection from their old-vine shiraz. The 2009 is dense... Named for the eutypa fungus that kills off one side of a bush vine, leaving the fruit on the other side that much more concentrated, The Dead Arm is d’Arenberg’s top selection from their old-vine shiraz. The 2009 is dense but not jammy, the rich black cherry juiciness lifted by tannins that fall somewhere between silk and satin. There’s a generosity to the wine that’s tied as much to its earthiness as to its fruit. Appealing now with lamb, this will gain from several years in the cellar.
Color & Type Red
Varietal Syrah
Country Australia
Region South Australia
Sub-region McLaren Vale
Vintage 2009

Label

For d’Arenberg’s Dead Arm Shiraz, small batches of grapes are gently crushed and then transferred to five ton open fermenters. These batches remain separate until final blending and foot treading is undertaken two-thirds of the way through fermentation. The wine is then basket pressed and transferred to a mixture of new and used French and old American oak barrels to complete fermentation. The barrel ferments are aged on lees, there is no racking until final blending and no fining or filtration.

The name Dead Arm pays a sort of tribute to a vine disease. Caused by the fungus Eutypa Lata that randomly affects vineyards all over the world, the result leaves one half of the vine, or an 'arm', reduced to dead wood. That side may be lifeless and brittle, but the grapes on the other side, while low yielding, display amazing intensity.

Winery

d'Arenberg

One of the most significant wineries in McLaren Vale, d’Arenberg was established in 1912 when Joseph Osborn, a teetotaler and director of Thomas Hardy and Sons, sold his stable of prize winning horses to purchase the property that now houses the winery, cellar door, and d’Arry’s Verandah Restaurant.

Chester Osborn, fourth generation family member and Chief Winemaker since 1984, has forged a reputation for producing strikingly individual wines and melding tradition and innovation. He has rejuvenated the 70 year old cellars and 19th Century vineyards and oversees all aspects of winemaking, viticulture and marketing.

Discovering new varieties suited to the diverse terroir of McLaren Vale has been an ongoing passion for Chester. Early in his tenure, he took leave from the winery and spent most of a year on a viticultural and oenological tour of France, Italy, Germany and Spain. He has since introduced many varieties to the region including Viognier, Marsanne, Roussanne, Tempranillo and Souzao. d’Arenberg now makes wine from over 33 different varieties.

Minimal input viticulture is employed across d’Arenberg owned, leased and contracted vineyards to ensure grape quality and environmental responsibility. This includes minimal or no irrigation, no soil cultivation, minimal spraying and most importantly, no fertilization. This natural and environmentally friendly philosophy encourages strong root systems that penetrate multiple levels of soil which is reflected in lively tannin structures, soil characters and fine minerality.

d'Arenberg is the only winery in Australia to basket press white wines as well as reds, making for a labor intensive process, but the quality of the results makes this worthwhile. This pressing is controlled and extremely gentle. White wines are basket pressed before fermentation to ensure no color or tannins are extracted from the skins, and the reds are pressed afterwards. After pressing, barrel fermented components are aged on lees to slow aging and keep the wine fresh, while also reducing oak influence. There is no racking until the final blending, and the wines do not undertake fining or filtration prior to bottling.