NV Xavier Vignon Chateauneuf-du-Pape La Reserve VII IX X
Proprietary Blend - 1.5L
NV Xavier Vignon Chateauneuf-du-Pape La Reserve VII IX X
  • WA 96

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In Stock: 1 btls
Ships Immediately

Pre-Arrival: 0 btls
ETA: Pending

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WA 96
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate, October 2014
While I reviewed this NV Châteauneuf du Pape La Reserve VII IX X (a blend from the 2007, 2009 and 2010 vintages) last year, I was able to taste it again this go around, and it still blew me away. Fabulously full-bodied...   While I reviewed this NV Châteauneuf du Pape La Reserve VII IX X (a blend from the 2007, 2009 and 2010 vintages) last year, I was able to taste it again this go around, and it still blew me away. Fabulously full-bodied and decadent, with loads of lavender, incense, black raspberry and cured-meat nuances, it’s still youthful and vibrant, with notable freshness and purity. Enjoy this brilliant wine through 2028. - Jeb Dunnuck  
Category Description
Color & Type Red
Varietal Proprietary Blend
Country France
Region Rhone
Sub-region Southern Rhone
Appellation Chateauneuf du Pape
Vintage NV
Size 1.5L
Percent alcohol 15%
Closure Cork

Label

Xavier Vignon Chateauneuf-du-Pape La Reserve VII IX X is a non-vintage wine made from a blend of the top barrels of the Cuvee Anonyme from 2007 (43%), 2009 (21%) and 2010 (36%).

Winery

Xavier Vignon

As the technical director and head enologist at “Avignon Oenologie Conseil,” Xavier oversees winemaking at more than 300 estates, including many of the best-known domaines in Châteauneuf-du-Pape. In lieu of payment for his laboratory’s service, he sometimes accepts wine, which “Xavier Vins,” the micro-négociant company he established in 2002, finishes and bottles.

Originally a physical chemist, Xavier is particularly interested in how the spectrum of dissolved mineral salts in the groundwater of each vineyard, which varies from parcel to parcel, influences the expression of terroir in the grapes. “I’m a trained enologist,” he says. “I’ve examined wine down to the molecular level. Which, in the end, convinces me that what is most important are the vines, the depth of the roots, and the health and balance of the vineyard.”